“A Different Kind of a Relationship”

Filed under :Health promoting

Having a bad relationship with food may be the reason you are failing at loosing that extra weight, or maintaining stable body weight.

Probably, you are making several mistakes over and over again, without even realizing it. Underestimating your calorie intake, an exercise routine that is not intense enough, or eating secretly (you are just cheating yourself and maybe your dietitian).  Trying to regulate all and keep track of everything can be frustrating and cause relapse (hence even more weight gain). This sounds like a very bad relationship with food and your body in general.

Consider starting a healthy relationship with food. This is a different approach to the binging/regretting/berating yourself approach that most people find themselves in these kinds of situations.  You should approach this state of mind by first asking a few questions and finding the answers to these questions.  Ask yourself: What is the purpose of food? What is it going to do to your body? Do you need this food in your body? Think of food as more than just, well, food. If you eat it, it will basically become a part of you.  For example, the carrots you decide to eat will contribute carbohydrates and vitamin A to your cell structure or chicken breast will provide protein for the body’s protein synthesis requirements. Don’t skip meals; eat when you are hungry so you don’t end up fighting the food, but rather think of it as doing something good for your body.

If you learn to understand the food that you eat (educating yourself by learning what each food will contribute to your body: carbohydrates for energy, vitamins for regulatory processes, healthy fats for a healthy heart and brain function, etc.) you will start making better choices and combinations of foods.  When you have this healthy understanding of food, you will be in control of supplying building blocks to your body and you will be in control of knowing when to stop eating. The binging will decrease.  For example, if you eat carbohydrates you know that you provided your body with energy so you can go workout and push yourself a little harder, run a little faster, or workout a little longer.

This healthy relationship with food may not form overnight.  However, if you start educating yourself about food and become curious of what you are putting into your body – it will be like a learning and discovery process.  For example, if you plan to eat some roasted eggplant and tomatoes salad for lunch you can go on one of the many “Nutrition Facts” websites online and see what you are actually putting into your body.  Look up eggplant and then look up the tomato.  When you see the good grade of the food you might feel better about yourself and will want to discover other good foods to eat the next day.

By forming this healthy relationship with food, you will also start forming a healthier relationship with your body.  This may be a longer process than it sounds in this short blog post (I started being curious about food content when I was 12 years old and I am still learning today). This is so much better than constantly trying new diets and failing.  A healthy relationship with food is what true healthy eating looks like!

Here is a list of some great web sites to check out for food contents and even grades:

  • http://nutritiondata.self.com
  • http://www.calorieking.com
  • http://caloriecount.about.com
  • http://www.nutritionsheet.com